Vigo County Public Library

October 16, 2014

npr:

When Malala Yousafzai found out last Friday that she’d won the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi, the 17-year-old Pakistani girl didn’t celebrate immediately. Instead she returned to a chemistry class at her high school in Birmingham, England.

The Nobel Prize, she joked on Friday, is “not going to help in exams.” Then she said: “I want to see every child going to school. There are still 57 million children who have not received education.”

What needs to be done to reach those unschooled children? Goats and Soda spoke with Jacqueline Bhabha, a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and director of research at the university’s FXB Center for Health and Human Rights who specializes in children’s rights.

What Will Malala’s Nobel Peace Prize Mean For Girls’ Education?

Photo credit: Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images

We love education, and we love Malala!  Come read about her amazing journey at the VCPL.

October 13, 2014
It’s that time again, friends!



Are you a super sleuth? Can you solve the mystery of a lifetime? Join us for a pizza dinner with a side of murder.
At the Convention of Conventions, fans of all kinds get together to discuss their favorite shows and movies. When a popular blogger turns up dead, you get to try and solve the mystery…before someone else becomes a victim!
Grades 6-12 only. After-hours program. Registration is required to attend. Doors will open at 6:15 and the event will begin at 6:30. Participants should be picked up promptly at 8:30.
Register here!

It’s that time again, friends!

Are you a super sleuth? Can you solve the mystery of a lifetime? Join us for a pizza dinner with a side of murder.

At the Convention of Conventions, fans of all kinds get together to discuss their favorite shows and movies. When a popular blogger turns up dead, you get to try and solve the mystery…before someone else becomes a victim!

Grades 6-12 only. After-hours program. Registration is required to attend. Doors will open at 6:15 and the event will begin at 6:30. Participants should be picked up promptly at 8:30.

Register here!

October 10, 2014
October 8, 2014

Did you grow up reading Peter Rabbit or other stories by Beatrix Potter? Emma Thompson is writing new stories about Peter and his friends, and talked to Jimmy Fallon about her process. Check out this video!

October 3, 2014

npr:

It’s October, which means it’s officially OK for Americans to go crazy about pumpkin and pumpkin-flavored stuff.

I’m fascinated by the pumpkin craze, so I searched our archives for related stories. I came across this neat 1996 All Things Considered interview about the origin of the pumpkin. The transcript is copied below. Photo: iStockphoto.

- Kate

DANIEL ZWERDLING, Host: And finally, to prepare you and your loved ones for Halloween, we have called Marjorie Cuyler [sp], author of The All Around Pumpkin Book, and we’ve asked her some of the pumpkin questions that undoubtedly you have been yearning to ask.

QUESTIONER: What is the origin of the pumpkin?

MARJORIE CUYLER, Author: The prevailing theory is that the first Indians who came to the Americas brought seeds with them from Asia.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: How long ago?

MARJORIE CUYLER: Thirteen thousand B.C.

QUESTIONER: What is the oldest pumpkin ever found?

MARJORIE CUYLER: The oldest evidence is actually in the mythology, in the Eastern part of the world. There’s a creation myth in eastern Indochina that the world was created from a pumpkin, and in Africa there’s some old, old stories about the pumpkin. There’s one about the devil dying and the pumpkin being born at that moment.

QUESTIONER: Why do we carve pumpkins at Halloween?

MARJORIE CUYLER: When the Europeans came to America, they brought certain customs with them. Certainly the ancient Celts had a tradition of carving turnips as part of the celebration of Samhain, S-A-M-H-A-I-N, which is a festival they held on October 31st to mark the end of the summer.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: Turnips?

MARJORIE CUYLER: And they would carve turnips because they felt that after 30- the 31st, winter would begin and spirits would walk the Earth during the darkness of winter. And if they could carry turnips with lights, candlelight inside of them, these lanterns would keep the evil spirits away from the people.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: So how did carved turnips from the- from England get to be pumpkins carved in the United States?

MARJORIE CUYLER: Well, when the Europeans came to America, the Indians were very helpful in teaching them how to grow pumpkins in mounds that were included among the corn crops. And as the settler- early American settlers began to grow pumpkins they realized that they could be used for the purpose of carrying lights inside. So they just felt that pumpkins were a more efficient vegetable than turnips or beets.

QUESTIONER: What are some great moments in pumpkin history?

MARJORIE CUYLER: On January 21st, 1950, a man named Alger Hiss was sentenced to five years in prison. Now back in the ’30s, in fact in 1938, he had been working for the State Department, and while he had that position he passed secret documents to the communists. Now the man who accused him in the ’50s, in 1950, was an ex-communist named Whittaker Chambers. And in court Mr. Chambers produced microfilm of the papers that he said Mr. Hiss had given to the Russians, and Mr. Chambers had kept the microfilm hidden in a pumpkin on his farm in Maryland. And that’s quite a famous story, and it certainly put pumpkins on the map.

DANIEL ZWERDLING: Marjorie Cuyler is author of The All Around Pumpkin Book. And for this evening, that’s All Things Considered.

Happy October!  Ever wondered about the origins of the pumpkin?  Wonder no more.  Learn even more about pumpkins here at the VCPL!

October 2, 2014
October 2, 2014

buckyy-barness:

In 1940, knowing that France was falling into the hands of the Germans, the workers of the Louvre took action. All 400,000 works were evacuated and sent to the south of France. In secret they transported the priceless paintings and statues, and held by wealthy families in Vichy,where they would remain for five years, only returning at the end of the war.The quick action of the workers without a doubt saved the masterpieces from becoming part of the over 5 million works that were looted by the Nazis during the war.

Your dose of world history!  What do you think would have happened to these works of art if the Nazis had gotten them?  What happened to the pieces that the Nazis DID loot?  Check it out here at the VCPL.

(via maggie-stiefvater)